Woman watching ted talks for supply chain manager

14 Great TED Talks for the Supply Chain Manager

TED Talks have become omnipresent in pop culture. Most Facebook feeds, twitter streams, and LinkedIn accounts have a TED Talk (or 2 or 3!) within digital reach at most times. With events popping up all over the country, a podcast, and it’s own space on some of the largest video platforms, the amount of content can be overwhelming. We’ve taken the time to sift through and find the best for our readers – especially a supply chain manager who wants to do great things with logistics. So, whether you are new to TED Talks, or just want to dive a little deeper, this is a great list with which to start.

Take a look and let us know what you think. If your favorite isn’t below, drop us a line or comment, and let us know what we are missing – we’d love to see more!

Our Picks for the Supply Chain Manager

Who:

Mick Mountz

What:

He addresses the discrepancy between traditional warehousing and online retail. The amount of choice for the consumer often outweighs the capabilities of the warehouse.

Why:

You’ll gain some insight on how to cut down on costs for warehousing – starting with how orders are picked.

 

Who:

Mallory Soldner

What:

A discussion of her quest to bring data into the humanitarian world. Using data can do more than turn a profit – it can save lives.

Why:

Get a glimpse into the possibilities for freight and logistics in the future. Understanding data can help the world evolve and improve.

 

Who:

Tom Wujec

What:

An examination of the unseen complexities of basic problems, and how solutions can differ with subtle cultural changes.

Why:

Gain a better understanding of what different types of tools do for your creative problem-solving. Plus a bunch of ideas on how to make toast.

 

Who:

Navi Radjou

What:

Some examples of incredible ingenuity to help solve problems like supplying clean drinking water in Peru.

Why:

This will help you explore the potential for your own work in supply chain management. What problem are you trying to solve? What change can you bring about through your work?

 

Who:

Philip Evans

What:

Breaking down the separation of business strategy from science and data.

Why:

See the possibilities of combining and mapping big data to see truths. Truths about your logistics business, niche industry, cultural world – rather than just a set of abstract patterns.

 

Who:

Steve Howard

What:

Why business should want to have a positive impact on the world.

Why:

Whatever your business may be, but especially if it is logistics, you have the ability to bring about change.

 

Who:

Bettina Warburg

What:

How the blockchain is a “continuation” of a very human story – “finding a way to lower uncertainty so that we can exchange value.”

Why:

The Approved Freight Team agrees with Bettina Warburg – blockchain technology has the ability to change the economy. More visibility and accountability in supply chains means greater gains for shippers, carriers, and consumers.

 

Who:

Yves Morieux

What:

How to streamline your business so that you are more efficient and work together.

Why:

If your head is spinning from the talks on the blockchain, changing the world, and making toast over a campfire, this will help bring some clarity to your business. By stripping away excess and getting real – you will better manage your business every day.

 

Who:

Joel Selanikio

What:

His realization that what was holding him back from influencing the world… was himself.

Why:

How sharing access to data and technology with others can help advance the world to new heights. But couple this with some of the other ideas here and you will begin to see the possibilities for the future.

 

Who:

Julio Gil

What:

How technology will bridge the gap between city and rural living.

Why:

With the onset of drones, IoT, and the rise in an “on-demand culture,” companies in the transportation and logistics industry must begin making preparations for the future of tech.

 

 

Who:

Andreas Raptopoulos

What:

The world’s infrastructure is dated and in need of an overhaul – so we must find alternative ways to reach many locations.

Why:

Did somebody say drones? Nothing says, “the future is here,” quite like cutting-edge drone technology. We will begin to see more and more drones in the logistics industry due to many of the reasons mentioned by Mr. Raptopoulos. If you’re a supply chain manager, you may already see the presence of this amazing technology.

 

Who:

Tricia Wang

What:

Some data cannot be quantified

Why:

In logistics, data is boss. But often big data misses the full truth. By inserting human factors, and experiences from the human narrative, you get to ask “why?” is this happening.

 

 

Who:

Paul Lightfoot

What:

He examines the parts of our food supply chain that aren’t just “inefficient, but toxic.”

Why:

We’ve presented a lot of big ideas in the videos above, but sometimes even good intentions fail, because of poor planning and process. Supply chain managers know that the entire chain – end-to-end – is what matters most.

 

 

Who:

Steven Johnson

What:

A challenge to the common belief that “good ideas” come from a personal “Eureka!” moment

Why:

The solutions you create to solve your clients’ problems are a culmination of other people’s ideas, what you have learned, and the times in which we live.

 

We know a lot of these ideas are pretty lofty for a supply chain manager. The daily grind of scheduling pick-ups, tracking deliveries, and uploading PODs can shroud the big picture. The Approved Team aims to bring better solutions to our clients every day. Through consistent assessment and continuous progress, we hope to bring better supply chains to shippers around the world. For more articles and content aimed to help empower supply chain professionals, subscribe here and get updates right in your inbox

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